20 Important Calendar Dates To Remember: Celebrating Greek Traditions with Food and Feasts


Image Source: The House The Lars Built

Yesterday was the first day of the year. Well, not the normal calendar first day of the year (since it is only September) but the day which marks the beginning of the Church year. It was a little confusing at first, so I did some research, compiled my notes and then published a post about Orthodox New Years Day – you can read it here.

Writing the New Years Day post inspired me to think about other special events that happen throughout the year. So, to make it easy for everyone, I compiled a list of 20 Important Calendar Dates To Remember.

These 20 dates are not ranked by importance and this list is certainly not the whole list! However this is a compiled list of what I have written so far. I plan to add more dates to this Calendar list as time goes on.

Some of these tradition dates are cultural, others are superstitious but most of them stem from the Orthodox religious calendar. Like typical Greek tradition, almost all of these events are celebrated with family and food so you will also find a few recipes in this list too.

Please leave a comment and tell me about the calendar events you celebrate with your family.

I would love to hear from you!

Sia

Save the Date

The Beginning of the Year

Easter Time

Christmas

Calendar Dates

Superstition and Culture

Photo Credit: Save the date cards designed by The House Lars Built. They are available to purchase from at this Etsy store: The House Lars Built


SiaSia Aristidou is the bride behind the Greek Weddings & Traditions blog. Fascinated by the rituals and traditions celebrated in Greek culture, Sia writes about love, marriage, family and tradition. You can connect with her on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram or by leaving a comment on the blog.  If you want to learn how to be a great Greek cook, then join Sia in the Greek Cooking Challenge.


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Happy New Year: Learn Why the Greek Orthodox Church Celebrates the New Year on the 1st of September


Happy New Year - To The Orthodox Church

It seems really strange to say HAPPY NEW YEAR today, but i’m not joking! It is actually the beginning of a New Year in the Orthodox Church.

According to this Antiochian website, the 1st of September marks the day when Jesus of Nazareth began preaching the good news of His mission. You can learn more about Orthodox religion and calendar dates on these websites:

GOARCH suggests that to the present day, the Church has always celebrated the beginning of the New Year on September 1st and that it was the custom in Constantinople until its fall in 1453.1st of September marks a New Year in the Orthodox Church

So, if today is New Years Day… what do we celebrate on the 1st of January? 

At the beginning of every Calendar year the Greeks in Greece celebrate the new year with fireworks, fun and food just like we do here in Australia. However the celebration I am writing about today is specific to Orthodox Faith and the Calendar of the Church. On the 1st of January, the Church celebrates the Feast Day of Saint Basil on this day. Like many Greek Traditions, we celebrate this Feast Day with food. The special dish made for Saint Basil is Vasilopita and you can find the recipe here.

A personal lesson learnt:

I might sound silly when I say this but when I heard that it was New Years Day, I automatically thought about cooking Vasilopita. I always associate the new year with this cake. However, we do not make Vasilopita on the 1st of September because the Vasilopita Bread or Cake doesn’t actually have anything to do with being a new year. Thinking about it out loud now… perhaps I should change all my recipe titles for Vasilopita. Because I call it the “New Years Day Bread” and this is technically the wrong title.

A couple of other important dates:

1. On the 1st of January, the Church also celebrates the Menaion and “the Lord’s Circumcision“.

2. The 1st of September is also my name day!!

Xronia Polla Everyone!!

Are you making any New Years Resolutions? 

 

Related Posts you might love:


SiaSia Aristidou is the bride behind the Greek Weddings & Traditions blog. Fascinated by the rituals and traditions celebrated in Greek culture, Sia writes about love, marriage, family and tradition. You can connect with her on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram or by leaving a comment on the blog.  If you want to learn how to be a great Greek cook, then join Sia in the Greek Cooking Challenge.


Want to Learn More About Greek Weddings & Traditions?
Subscribe to the Blog and Follow Us:
            

5 Hilarious Greek Sayings


GWS Quote - The Bride Farted

Greek sayings are known to be witty and humorous, sometimes a bit naughty but always very, very true!

They are used to traditionally describe every aspect of our lives, from birth to death and they extract valuable lessons learned by the Greeks since, oh well… forever!

Wedding-Related Greek Sayings

Here are 5 Greek sayings about weddings and married life:

#1

Greek: “Το λέω στη νύφη για να το ακούσει η πεθερά”

Greeklish: To leo sti nifi gia na to akousi i pethera

English: I am telling the bride for the mother in law to hear

Picture this: You are in the kitchen, in your mom’s house and you are drinking coffee and eating cookies with your mom and mother in law. Your mother in law makes a mess and all the cookie crumbs fall on to the floor.

What would your mom do? Speaking as a true Greek she would probably yell at YOU for making a mess on the floor with all the cookie crumbs. Yes, yes, you! She couldn’t possibly yell at your mother in law, could she? But by giving you the blame, your mother in law will hear this and be more careful without directly being offended. Smart. Continue reading

Eleni and Ross – A Greek Italian Wedding


Eleni and Ross - Greek Italian Wedding

Eleni and Ross married on 29 June 2013 at Saint Stephens Catholic Church and also at Saint George Greek Orthodox Church in Brisbane, Australia

Eleni (the gorgeous bride in this photo) is a primary school friend of mine. We go way back to grade three together and I vividly remember how envious I was of Eleni and her sticker book. She had the best stickers any eight year old girl could ever imagine. Detailed and perfectly organised pages and pages of stickers. The kind that no one else had. The kind that every girl wanted. Twenty-something years on, Eleni is still a lover of beautiful things and she has an amazing attention to detail.

Eleni and her handsome hubby Ross had two ceremonies on their wedding day. Eleni is Greek Orthodox and Ross is Italian Catholic. Rather than choosing one religion, the beautiful couple decided to get married in two different Churches. I was very excited to learn more about their unique wedding story, so I asked Eleni for an interview. Here is what she said:

Eleni and Ross - Greek Italian Wedding

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Gemista Stuffed Tomatoes – Greek Cooking Challenge Recipe 8


How to Be A Good Greek Cook - Join the #GreekCookingChallenge in 2014

How to Be A Good Greek Cook – Join the #GreekCookingChallenge in 2014

Greek Cooking Challenge

August 2014

GEMISTA STUFFED TOMATOES

Gemista Stuffed Tomatoes - Greek Cooking Challenge
This month we are making Gemista which is also known as stuffed tomatoes. You can use this recipe to make stuffed eggplant, stuffed zucchini or stuffed any kind of vegetable you like.

What I love about this dish is that it is that Gemista can be stuffed with your favourite meats or adapted to be a tasty vegetarian or vegan meal. It can also be cooked completely gluten free and is sometimes considered paleo.

The Gemista recipe I have chosen for this month is written by Panos from the blog Cook Me Greek. Panos cooks with his mother in their family taverna in Greece and writes about his family recipes and cooking tips.

Join the Greek Cooking Challenge and share your cooking photos with me on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram using the hashtag #GreekCookingChallenge

Gemista - Greek Cooking Challenge

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